The best Northumberland Bed and Breakfasts at amazing prices

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Northumberland Bed and Breakfast accommodation at amazing prices

  • Browse from our collection of B&Bs and boutique hotels in the historic county of Northumberland.
  • Options range from small independent hotels to family-run guest houses, where you will be looked after by the owner.
  • In all cases, you will have a comfy bed and breakfast will be prepared for you. 
  • Northumberland is a county which is steeped in history, as well as being home to Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Our accommodation will provide a distinct taste of this county, all at an affordable price.

Use the form above to check availability and prices across our entire selection of Northumberland accommodation.

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If there are no available rooms at present or if you simply can't find what you are looking for, it may be worth having a look at our sister website, www.historicbritain.com/northumberland.

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Northumberland Visitor information

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An Introduction to Northumberland

Northumberland, is home to many historic market or ford towns such as Berwick upon Tweed, Alnwick, Hexham, Morpeth and Rothbury. The county features a long and dramatic coast to the east, moorland to west and Roman ruins in the south. The area has been fought over by the Scots and English throughout the centuries. The county is predominantly rural and features both the rolling moorland of the Cheviots and coastal castles of Lindisfarne and Bamburgh.

Things to do in Northumberland

Alnwick castle, used as the set for Hogwarts in Harry Potter, is one of the many castles in the area which also includes Warkworth Castle. Lindisfarne Priory was the home of St. Cuthbert and is open to visitors. Hadrians Wall can also be visited as well as the beach and the Kieder observatory. Northumberland National Park is beautiful and it is rarely busy.

Getting to Northumberland

By Air

Newcastle Airport can be reached in less than an hour from most places in the county.

By Car

Northumberland has access from Scotland and the south via the A1 London to Edinburgh motorway running the length of the county. The A69 and A66 connect to the M6 and the A19 provides an alternative route from the south, linking the Port of Tyne to Northumberland.

By Train

Stations in Northumberland on the East Coast mainline from London Kings Cross to Aberdeen include Newcastle, Morpeth, Alnmouth and Berwick-upon-Tweed. The region is situated just over three hours from London Kings Cross.

By Coach and Bus

National Express travel all over the county to Northumberland. Megabus is also available for long distance travel. Bus operators in the area include Stagecoach and Arriva.

History 

Northumberland History

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Northumberland, England's northernmost county, is a land where Roman occupiers once guarded a walled frontier. In 793 Vikings landed on the island and burnt the settlement, killing many of the monks who had previously settled. The survivors, rebuilt the church and continued to live there until 883, when, through fear of a second invasion of the Danes, they fled inland, taking with them the body of Cuthbert and other holy relics.

The kingdom of Northumbria ceased to exist in 927, when it was incorporated into England as an earldom by Athelstan, the first king of a united England.

The Normans rebuilt the Anglian monasteries and founded Norman abbeys. Many castles were built. From the Norman Conquest until the union of England and Scotland under James I and VI, the Scots attempted invasion many times, causing devastation to the region. In 1513, King James IV of Scotland was slain in the battle of Flodden Field on Branxton Moor.

Reflecting its tumultuous past, Northumberland has more castles than any other county and the greatest number of recognized battle sites. It was once an economically important region that supplied much of the coal that powered the industrial revolution.

The following events are occuring in the area

Universities in Northumberland

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